Fair Fashion

Ethical Athleisure Wear: Eco-Chick’s Holiday Gift Guide #4

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Our beloved and well-used (judging from the numbers of views and shares from past years) gift guide is BACK! As you know, we like our gifts to bring a smile to the faces of friends and families—and help small-business owners, local makers, and people who live and work in places who have a lot less than we do.

All the products below are fair-trade, ethical, locally made, eco-friendly, low-impact, or (most likely) some combination of the previous.

And if you are still looking for that perfect (ethical) thing for that special someone, our recent list of 8 great ethical boutiques is a great place to start—and so is our Resources page. Happy shopping!

 

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With 2015 marking the rise of the Athleisure trend, it has become easier – and chicer – than ever to go from the gym to the office and beyond. Inspired by yoga, pilates, and dance, Prancing Leopard Organics definitely keeps the trend going with their collection of mindfully constructed sportswear. Each piece is designed thoughtfully to help you move spiritedly and literally “prance” through your life! Read more about Prancing Leopard Organics and their philanthropic activities here.

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Founded in 1995, eco-friendly fashion brand Alternative Apparel has since expanded their line of effortlessly stylish wardrobe essentials to include activewear pieces such as sports bras and leggings. A certified Green Business as designated by the City of Los Angeles, Alternative Apparel offers 100% organic cotton garments and prides itself on it’s transparency by disclosing their factory locations and labor management practices. Read more about Alternative Apparel’s commitment to creating sustainable products here.

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Prana‘s name is a direct reference to the Sanskrit word for life, perfectly encapsulating the active lifestyle that the company centers its clothing around. Inspired by rock-climbing and yoga, Prana builds activewear that can perform in any environment. Not only does their collection look good and play hard, Prana is an active member of the Fair Labor Association and is also committed to lowering its greenhouse gas emissions.

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Based out of Santa Cruz, CA, Synergy Organic Clothing combines sustainable practices with modern design that looks great and is gentle on the earth. Their clothing is hand made by their Nepali team and their fair trade practices are verified by their long-term relationship with frequent trips to Nepal.

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Despite what a lot of brands like to claim, bamboo isn’t inherently eco-friendly due to the fact that it takes a lot of chemical processing to turn it into a textile. But if done right – like Tasc Performance is doing – it can be a great vegan alternative to wool and petroleum-based textiles. Tasc uses certified organic bamboo sourced from the Sichuan province of China, and uses a patent-pending production process to create a fabric that is certified Oeko Tex 100.

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At the core of Yoga Democracy is the concept of Ahimsa, meaning to do no harm. Starting with using recycled materials (each pair of leggings represent the equivalent of 16 oz water bottles), Yoga Democracy also uses a zero-water process, non-toxic dyes, and donates 10% of their net profits to environmental causes worldwide.

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While the benefits of yoga range from de-stressing to toning your butt, there’s no question that its original philosophy runs deeper than just serving as an antidote to a chaotic world. As India-based yoga wear line Proyog states: “If yoga comes from India, the onus of true yoga wear cannot be on the world.” As well as being ethically and sustainably designed and produced, Proyog aims to stay true to the traditional practice of yoga by eschewing PET fibers that negatively affect your flow and environment. Read more about Proyog here!

Soyo Hong (b. 1989, Seoul, Korea) is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. An artist and writer in NYC, she is a regular contributor to digital platforms such as Animal New York, Hopes&Fears, and Ratter.